Leaving St. Louis x Thank You #docnowcommunity 

Fantastic two days in St. Louis building with the Documenting the Now community. Wow. When we discuss how #digitalhumanities can work in cahoots with black studies, with activists and communities, and have a social justice imperative that centers the most vulnerable, this is what we are talking about. The #docnowcommunity models the kind of work that gets done when ethics and radical praxis are the starting points. I’m so honored to be among you all!! More thoughts to come on the experience as a whole, but I’m excited about where this is going and can’t wait to see happens next. 

I came back to my alma mater to attend this meeting, to the city where I pledged “all of my love, my peace and happiness” to Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. I saw my linesisters who surprised me with new position, new location gifts and loved on me some blessings for the new year. I hugged my MMUF mentor. I hugged undergrad homefolk like Diana Hill Mitchell. So much the change, so much the same. Time is a circle, but that kinship thing? Still obsessed. Humans are more important than archives,  Sarah Jackson said yesterday. And this thing we are all in is a “human business,” Herman Beavers reminded me just a week ago. What a way to end the summer. Love, love you all.

Revisiting: Woods – “Do You Know What it Means to Miss New Orleans?”

STAFF PHOTO BY TED JACKSON Protestors exit the offices of HUD in New Orleans after a 90 minute sit-in. Police responded by blocking off the area and negotiating with the group, Friday, August 31, 2007.
STAFF PHOTO BY TED JACKSON
Protestors exit the offices of HUD in New Orleans after a 90 minute sit-in. Police responded by blocking off the area and negotiating with the group, Friday, August 31, 2007.

Revisiting: Woods – “’Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans?:’ Katrina, Trap Economics, and the Rebirth of the Blues” (2005):
Continue reading “Revisiting: Woods – “Do You Know What it Means to Miss New Orleans?””

Sex, Blood, and Belonging in the Early Republic

 

My latest is up at the African American Intellectual History Society blog–a shortened version of my remarks at the 2016 annual meeting of the Society for Historians of the Early Republic:

 

“The following remarks were delivered in June 2016 at the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Annual Meeting. The roundtable, “Blood, Belonging, Citizenship, and Legal Personhood in the Early Republic: A Roundtable,” brought together “four scholars whose current projects grapple with how the oppressed and disenfranchised elaborated their place in the body politic and, just as importantly, conceived of their own humanity. Calling upon notions of blood, belonging, citizenship, humanity, and legal personhood, former slaves, free people of color, and white women both criticized the state and also imagined a future (and a past) for themselves that recognized their autonomy and their membership in the republic.” My spoken remarks were titled, “Sex, Blood, and Belonging.” A shorter version of those remarks is presented with light edits below….

Read it all: Sex, Blood, and Belonging in the Early Republic

The Movement for Black Lives: Demands

They write:

“We recognize that not all of our collective needs and visions can be translated into policy, but we understand that policy change is one of many tactics necessary to move us towards the world we envision. We have come together now because we believe it is time to forge a new covenant. We are dreamers and doers and this platform is meant to articulate some of our vision. The links throughout the document provide the stepping-stones and roadmaps of how to get there. The policy briefs also elevate the brave and transformative work our people are already engaged in, and build on some of the best thinking in our history of struggle. This agenda continues the legacy of our ancestors who pushed for reparations, Black self-determination and community control; and also propels new iterations of movements such as efforts for reproductive justice, holistic healing and reconciliation, and ending violence against Black cis, queer, and trans people.”

Read it all: Platform – The Movement for Black Lives