1662

A black and white engraving, caption, "Wm. Gribble's Best Virginia Tobacco Barnstaple". Shows black man smoking a long-stemmed pipe. This paper is 3 1/8 inches H x 2 3/8 W, and is one of 41 tobacco papers of similar dimensions at CW issued by tobacconists in England, including this one from Barnstaple, Devon. Courtesy, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Williamsburg, Virginia; image C1980-866. // http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/Slavery/detailsKeyword.php?keyword=tobacco&recordCount=25&theRecord=3

A black and white engraving, caption, “Wm. Gribble’s Best Virginia Tobacco Barnstaple”. Shows black man smoking a long-stemmed pipe. This paper is 3 1/8 inches H x 2 3/8 W, and is one of 41 tobacco papers of similar dimensions at CW issued by tobacconists in England, including this one from Barnstaple, Devon.
Courtesy, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Williamsburg, Virginia; image C1980-866. // http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/Slavery/detailsKeyword.php?keyword=tobacco&recordCount=25&theRecord=3

 

“In 1662, Virginia legally recognized slavery as a hereditary, lifelong condition. Even before this statute appeared, however, many blacks were being held as slaves for life, and as black laborers gradually replaced white indentured servants as the principle source of agricultural labor during the second half of the seventeenth century, laws restricting the activities of Africans were being introduced, codifying slavery as a race-based system. South Carolina, for example, passed an Act for the Better Ordering and Governing of Negroes and Slaves in 1696. This comprehensive code outlined severe penalties for a variety of offenses committed by blacks and excused any white who caused the death of a slave while carrying out a punishment. The South Carolina act was based upon the slave codes of Barbados and became the prototype for other American colonies writing black oppression into law….”

Source: Slavery and the Making of America . The Slave Experience: Legal Rights & Gov’t | PBS

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s