Maryland, 1664

Source William Still, The Underground Railroad (Philadelphia, 1872), facing p. 102. (Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) Comments Caption, "Twenty Eight Fugitives Escaping From the Eastern Shore of Maryland." Still was the son of fugitive slaves and headed the underground railroad in Philadelphia through the 1850s (information provided by Phil Lapsansky, Library Company of Philadelphia).

Caption, “Twenty Eight Fugitives Escaping From the Eastern Shore of Maryland.” Still was the son of fugitive slaves and headed the underground railroad in Philadelphia through the 1850s (information provided by Phil Lapsansky, Library Company of Philadelphia). William Still, The Underground Railroad (Philadelphia, 1872), facing p. 102. (Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.

“An act concerning Negroes and other slaves Be it enacted by the Right Honorable the Lord Proprietary by the advise and consent of the upper and lower house of this present Generall Assembly, that all Negroes or other slaves already within the province, and all Negroes and other slaves to be hereafter imported into the province, shall serve durante vita [hard labor for life]. And all children born of any Negro or other slave shall be slaves as their fathers were, for the term of their lives. And forasmuch as divers freeborn English women, forgetful of their free condition and to the disgrace of our nation, marry Negro slaves, by which also divers suits may arise touching the issue of such women, and a great damage befalls the masters of such Negroes for prevention whereof, for deterring such freeborn women from such shameful matches. Be it further enacted by the authority, advise, and consent aforesaid. that whatsoever freeborn woman shall marry any slave from and after the last day of this present Assembly shall serve the master of such slave during the life of her husband. And that all the issue of such freeborn women so married shall be slaves as their fathers were. And be it further enacted, that all the issues of English or other freeborn women that have already married Negroes shall serve the masters of their parents till they be thirty years of age and no longer”

Source: Proceedings and Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland (September 1664).

 

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